Urgent Need for Volunteers – please share!

October 19, 2015

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Earlier this fall we wrote about why STEM Education was important, and how you could help.  See the full article here.

Rochester Engineering Society’s Volunteer Coordinator Jon Kriegel has many opportunities in our classrooms that are looking for volunteers, and his focus this fall is identifying new volunteers and getting them matched up with area projects.

An informational meeting for anyone interested in volunteering will be held on November 5th at 7:00 PM at the Rochester Museum and Science Center.

This meeting is open to the public, and anyone interested in volunteering is encouraged to attend.

If you are able to attend, please register so that we can make sure we have enough space and materials:  Click here to register.

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Who should attend?

  • Retired Engineers
  • Engineers who work B or C shift
  • Volunteers whose employer supports community involvement during the day
  • Anyone with a STEM background that has time during the school day

What kind of Volunteer Opportunities are available?

Please share this meeting announcement.  The more potential volunteers we can connect with, the better!

For more information on this program, please call RES Volunteer Coordinator Jon Kriegel at (585) 281-5216.


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STEM Education is Important – and You Can Help!

September 17, 2015

How do you arm a STEM Teacher with real-world application examples?

Put an Engineer in the classroom!

The Rochester area has a long history of outreach success. As the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields continue to grow, this outreach is even more important.

Princii RES

Bringing Engineering principles right into the classroom.

The Rochester Engineering Society (RES) is inviting Engineers across our region to support a myriad of STEM initiatives by volunteering their time in the classroom starting this fall.

Why do we want to put Engineers in the classroom?

• To help the Teachers stay current with our ever-changing technology.
• To share real life examples with students, exploring topics in a meaningful way that the students will remember.
• To support the teacher with the delivery of engineering and technology concepts, while also providing the supportive hardware necessary to make these concepts tangible.

Please consider advancing STEM education in upstate NY by visiting classrooms and sharing your personal experiences and successes. We seek Engineers to work on topics chosen by either the classroom teacher or by you. Many opportunities are available, and you can work at a school of your choosing, or elect to be placed where there is the highest need for volunteers.

Together we can make a difference in how students see STEM-related career options, and help our teachers stay technically current.

Human Gyro (1)

Demonstrating cocepts through real life experience with the human gyrosphere

Who can volunteer?

Ideally, we are looking for volunteers available during the day. Retired Engineers, or those that have a flexible work environment that lets them visit schools during the traditional school day are in the highest demand. All you need is a background in Engineering or another STEM field, and a willingness to spark an interest in STEM in today’s youth.

For more information, please visit www.roceng.org/volunteer or call (585) 281-5216.  Please share this opportunity with anyone you think might be interested.  There are many positions and opportunities available!

RES also sponsors an Engineering Explorer Post, which we highlighted earlier this year during Engineering Week.  Read more about Explorer Post 801 here.

Jon Kriegel is a Director and Past President of the Rochester Engineering Society.  Jon began mentoring and volunteering as part of Eastman Kodak’s 21st Century Learning Challenge, and continues to volunteer today through his work as the Volunteer Coordinator at the RES.


The “E” in STEM

April 20, 2015

Last month during Engineering Week, we started taking a look at Engineering Explorer Posts available to our local High School Students.  This week’s focus is on Explorer Post 801, hosted by the Rochester Engineering Society.

Explorer Post 801

Explorer Post 801

The members of the Rochester Engineering Society (RES) feel the best part of STEM is the “E”.  Each year, the RES sponsors “Career Options in Engineering”, Explorer Post 801.  The post is open to older high school girls and boys in the five county area around Rochester, NY.  The focus is to help students find out what “Engineering is really about”.

The stereotypical engineer has thick glasses, bends over a desk all day, writes with a mechanical pencil all while avoiding eye contact with people.  The purpose of Post 801 is to introduce students to real engineers, doing real work in the real world.  I’ll bet there is at least one of us that matches the stereotype, but most engineers spend their day talking with other engineers, customers, trades people and consumers trying to solve real problems.

Explorers at __________

Inside the RIT Microelectronics clean room

Students hear about a typical day in the life of an engineer from the engineer.  Students learn about engineering education, about the perks of being an engineer and even about some of the trials an engineer might experience.  This is not about slick power point presentations, but more show and tell, with a smattering of advice from the heart.

Each of our presenters tells the story of their road to engineering.  Some were math whizzes in high school but a few were not!  They tell the story of what college they selected and why.  We always hear a few stories about special jobs they did that you would never expect an engineer to do.  One has a story of cleaning up Anthrax contamination in a NYC sky scraper while another has stories of working on JFK autopsy pictures.

Explorers at ______

Gleason Works

Each engineer tells the story of a job that pays well, offers constant challenges and continuous learning, but offers the bigger perk of personal satisfaction.  At the end of the day, engineers design and build products that help people.  Imagine your personal pride as you are in a car driving over the Frederick Douglass – Susan B. Anthony Memorial Bridge in Rochester with your family and grandchildren, knowing that your work helps tens of thousands of people make it home from work each day, every day, safely and quickly.

The post runs from January to March, meeting each Thursday night from 6:30 to 8:30.  Sign up is in early October.  This year we had 24 students and 12 meetings.  Our students met engineers from: Chemical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Structural Engineering, Highway Engineering, Bio medical Engineering, Microelectronic Engineering, Software Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering, Electro-Magnetic Interference Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Imaging Science.  You can see the full schedule on the RES Website.

Explorers at _____

Chemical Engineering at RIT

Each week we meet at a new location so we can see and feel what it is like to be an engineer.  We tour facilities like: the Gleason Works, the Microelectronics Wafer Fab Facility at RIT, the Bio-medical Engineering labs at the U of R, the Electro-Magnetic Interference and Product Safety Test Engineering labs at TUV Rheinland of North America and the Ginna Nuclear power plant.

The RES Explorers would like to express our appreciation for the generosity of our host companies, institutions and most importantly the presenters that donated their time and talents to meet with our students.  Our program will start again in January 2016 and we would welcome your children.  Contact Lynne Irwin at the RES res@frontiernet.net (585) 254-2350 or Keith Gomez Keith.Gomez@scouting.org from the Seneca Waterways Council, BSA (585) 244-4210 for more information.  The cost of the program is approximately $40.

Richard Repka is a Commercialization manger at Kodak Alaris.  He has a BS & MS in Electrical Engineering from RIT and Syracuse University.  Richard is a Senior Member of the IEEE and a member of the Rochester Engineering Society (RES), where he also leads the RES Explorer Post 801.RESLOGOFINAL_cmyk_tagc


Celebrate Engineering Week!

February 25, 2015

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Did you know that this week is Engineering Week?

National Engineering week was first celebrated in 1951.   The National Society of Professional Engineers was the first group to recognize the event, which is now celebrated by more than 70 engineering, education, and cultural societies, as well as over 50 corporations and government agencies.  Historically held in February, during the week of George Washington’s birthday, it also pays homage to our first President.  Washington is considered to be our Nation’s first Engineer, notably for his survey work.YoungGW-Survey

Many Engineering programs are in the works this week.  DiscoverE  (formerly the National Engineers Week Foundation) states that Engineers Week aims to:

  • Celebrate how engineers make a difference in our world
  • Increase public dialogue about the need for engineers
  • Bring engineering to life for kids, educators, and parents

More than a week-long event, Engineers Week is a year-round commitment to making a difference. Check out DiscoverE for more information.  You can also find many great Engineering Week activities and discussion topics on the National Society of Professional Engineers website.   Where can Engineering take you?  Meet some current Engineers at Be An Engineer.

Check back later this week as we take a look at some of the Engineering Explorer Posts in our area, where high school students are exploring Engineering in a very hands-on way!Engineers-Logo

 


Exciting new Incentive Program for NYS STEM Students

May 14, 2014

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has announced an exciting new Incentive Program for college-bound STEM students across New York State.graphic header

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the launch of the New York State Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Incentive Program, which will encourage the best and brightest high school students to pursue high-demand, high-tech careers and build their future in New York. The program provides a full SUNY or CUNY tuition scholarship to the top 10% of students in every New York high school if they major in a STEM field and work in a STEM job in New York State for five years after graduation.  (May 6, 2014)

There are several eligibility criteria, such as an applicant must:

  • Be a NYS resident
  • Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen
  • Be enrolled full time at a SUNY or CUNY college beginning with the fall term following his or her high school graduation
  • Be ranked in the top 10% of his/her high school graduating class of a NYS high school
  • Be matriculated in an undergraduate program leading to a degree in Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics at a SUNY or CUNY college
  • Earn a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or higher each term after the first semester
  • Execute a service contract agreeing to reside and work in NYS for five years in the field of Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics. View the terms and conditions of the service contract
  • Not be in default on a student loan made under any NYS or federal education loan program or repayment of any state award
  • Be in compliance with the terms of any service condition imposed by a state award

For more information about this incentive program, please visit the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation website.  You’ll find all the details you need, including how to apply, and special details and restrictions.


Family Fun at Imagine RIT!

May 8, 2014

Ready to go exploring!

On Saturday, our family attended the Imagine RIT Innovation and Creativity Festival. This was our first time attending, but it will definitely not be the last! There was so much to do for children of all ages, that I will definitely be marking the calendar each year for this event.  Our entire family attended, including 2 teenagers (17 and 15) and 2 elementary students (9 and 7).  We had a blast exploring the entire campus.  There were so many things to do it was hard to decide what to do first.

I really appreciated the Plan Your Day section of the Imagine RIT  Website.  You could choose from preselected itineraries (we chose Elementary and High School) as well as a build-your-own itinerary that we tried out as well.  Along with the map, the itineraries were very helpful in figuring out where we wanted to go, and what we wanted to see.  Upon arrival, we were greeted at one of the several Welcome Centers, where we received a full size map and events listing that really helped us as we navigated our way through our itinerary.

Sustainability Passport

Sustainability Passport

Some of the buildings we went through quickly, while others we really explored all they had to offer.  In the Sustainability Hall we had fun filling our a Passport at the different exhibits.  There was so much to see that you really could spend the whole day there and not see it all.

The one exhibit that we had talked about ahead of time, that was on our “must do” list was the robotic s’more maker.  Of course this was all the way at the other end of campus from where we parked, and we saw some very cool stuff on our way across campus.  From the Concrete Canoe to the Robotic Fish, there were interesting things to learn about at every turn.

The robotic fish drew a huge crowd

The robotic fish drew a huge crowd

The Cement Canoe really floats!

The Cement Canoe really floats!

Along with informational displays, there were hands-on opportunities throughout the festival.  We made pinwheels as we learned about alternative energy sources, had faces painted as we learned about eco-friendly materials and learned about electromagnetics as we tried to pop balloons with an electromagnetic dart.

We took a wrong turn trying to find an exhibit and found ourselves in the Project Lead The Way department.  This ended up being a nice little detour as my older boys (who both participate in PLTW at Brockport High School) were able to explain the many projects on display to their younger siblings.

Overall, this was a great experience and a really nice event to take the family too.  Even with a wide range of ages, we found things of interest to everyone – parents included!

Making a pinwheel to demonstrate alternative energy

Making a pinwheel to demonstrate alternative energy

If you went to the festival, RIT would love to hear from you!  Please fill out their survey to let them know about your experience.  Survey participants have a chance to win a prize if they complete the survey by May 14, 2014.

They have already announced the date for next year, so mark your calendars:  May 2, 2015.

Tammy Bonisteel works for the Fingerlakes STEM Hub and maintains the Hub Website along with the STEM Hub blog.  She lives in Brockport, NY where she is an active community volunteer.

 


High Tech Night at MCC

March 31, 2014

Last week we attended the High Tech Night at MCC.  This Annual event is a great opportunity for students interested in Engineering and other high-tech fields to take a look at some local companies and see what they have to offer.  I attended with my high school freshman, who is a current participant in our high school’s Project Lead the Way program.  He was surprised at the many different ways companies used Engineers, and how different the jobs looked depending on what the company’s focus was.  It was eye opening to see the many opportunities there are in the Engineering and Technical fields.

One of the hands on demonstrations - plastic injection molding

One of the hands on demonstrations: plastic injection molding

Our region has many high-tech companies, and many of them were on-site to showcase who they are and what they do.  There were several booths that had video presentations, they all had staff willing to answer questions, and many of them had a hands-on component.  The hands-on displays were a huge hit, as evidenced by the crowds at these stations as teens lined up to participate.  We were able to see how contact lenses are made and the various stages they go through before being delivered to the consumer, how a 3-D printer works, and even learned how to operate a plastic injection mold to make a small screwdriver.

The RIT Racing Team's display was a big hit!

The RIT Racing Team’s display was a big hit!

In addition to the company displays, there were several colleges represented that had information on their Technology and Engineering programs.  MCC had multiple tables showcasing the many different options they currently offer, and there were also tables from Syracuse University and Rochester Institute of Technology.  RIT brought their student-made race car from their racing team, and that was a huge draw as well.

Group tours of MCC’s labs and buildings were also offered for anyone that wanted a close-up look at the facilities being used in their programs.  Between the tours and the displays, there were many ways to explore the field in an engaging manner, and my high-schooler left with a better grasp of what career paths could be in his future if he wanted to continue along the engineering path.

The Sky Op, a remote-controlled aerial videocamera

The Sky Op

My son’s favorite display was from a local company called SkyOp.  They build unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), which are basically a remote-controlled mini helicopter, that carries a video camera.  The staff were very engaging and were great at answering all the questions my son had about how long the battery life is (about 20 minutes), how much they cost (depends on size) and how durable they are (quite, and we got several stories of accidental landings and how well they fared).

The presenters were all very engaging and asked the students about themselves, what they wanted to study, and offered tips on course selection (take math and science, and lots of it!) as well as offering some information on internships and entry-level job opportunities.

If you have a student interested in the high tech fields, this is a great opportunity to learn more about what is available locally and to see recent developments in the field.  I would highly recommend going.  This event is run annually at MCC in the early Spring.